Skip to main content

Improving your on time delivery performance using your MIS


MIS Overview

Most businesses have some kind of MIS (Management Information System) that is designed to drive the actions of the business. Whether you use CRM, ERP, an online project management software application, or a spreadsheet, they all can count as a MIS. Over time the quality and usability of that system can wane and leave the business with a less than effective tool for running the business.

Correcting this situation is not difficult. If this is something that irritates you as you strive to achieve a consistent on time delivery performance (with the accompanying high level of customer satisfaction and business profit) then read on.

Lack of understanding

One of the most common reasons I have come across for a MIS system losing effectiveness stems back to a lack of understanding of, and around, the system being used. There are two issues here that I would like to quickly touch upon.

The first is the lack of appreciation by team members of why a healthy system is required. As time pressures mount it becomes quite normal for people to cut corners with their tasks in order to relieve the pressure. When this behaviour leads to database entries not being completed fully, or shorthand being used unnecessarily, it can have a knock on effect down the line. In this instance the person who is cutting the corner does so because they don’t appreciate the issues this can cause further downstream. Education, possibly with the aid of a process map, can help users appreciate the importance of completing tasks thoroughly (e.g. if I don’t do this then they have do this additional work).

The second issue is a lack of practical knowledge about how to use the system. Quite often this is seen with newer members of the team who have been trained by internal members of staff who themselves are not entirely sure about the functionality of the system. This can lead to workarounds being created, methods of working that are external to the main system. I have seen businesses who are driven entirely by their workarounds and who wonder why their business performance is so hit and miss. Creating practical, user based, instructions (such as ‘Standard Operating Procedures’) and combining these with a skills matrix is a good way to resolve this issue.

Trust the healthy system

When the data is right in a business system we can use it to help make the right decisions at the right time, getting rid of the unnecessary tasks surrounding the MIS. This means that we can spend more time working on achieving the goals of the business and less time running around like headless chickens.




Giles Johnston

Popular posts from this blog

Kaizen improvements need to be specific

Do you find that your Kaizen improvements don't always go to plan? If you do, then you're with the majority! Whilst there is great deal of 'trial and error' there is a simple approach that can help. Available from Amazon Being specific about critical parts of your improvement can uplift your results. So, how do you go about doing this? The most direct route is to be clear about which parts of your improvement are critical. From here you can explain, in detail, what you want for those items. This might take some practice as many of us have become lazy in this regard. We take it for granted that our team 'get us' and will know what they need to do. If you ever feel that something basic is missing from an improvement ask this question: "What does good look like?" The answer should put you back on track. About the author: Giles Johnston is a Chartered Engineer who specialises in helping businesses to grow and improve through better business processes and

Where to start with Kaizen, if you just aren't sure

Kaizen is a great word. It is a word that can unleash the potential of both a business and an individual. Kaizen means more than just continuous improvement. It is a word that is linked to: Confidence Growth Exploration Courage Many people I speak to, that are new to improvement projects, aren't sure if they are on the right path when it comes to embracing the spirit of Kaizen. If you are also one of these people then let me share with you a few thoughts that can help you feel at ease about starting and leading change. Start with your concerns A great place to start your improvement life is with anything that isn't right. Getting your concerns out into the open really is the first step for most of us. If you aren't happy with something, raise it. This isn't only a great place to start, but something that you shouldn't give up. Whenever a standard is not being met, or not even defined, get vocal and then do something about it. Start small The intention of Kaizen is

Stimulating Kaizen opportunities - the 'mechanical' way!

I often end up in conversations about how to stimulate Kaizen ideas and opportunities. If you have read my other posts, you will know that I split the improvement journey into two halves. For many people, the initial Kaizen focus is all around fixing things that are wrong / not working properly. Once you get past this point you need something else to focus and motivate you to generate improvement opportunities. The two halves of the Kaizen journey The discussion that I often end up in, is the one around the imagination quandary. People talk to me about not being creative, or not being inspired to come up with improvement ideas. Do you ever feel this way? It seems that there is a popular view that some people are creative and some aren't. Great Kaizen ideas are not just the product of 'creative' people. There are lots of ways that you can generate improvement ideas without having to sit on a mountain top cross legged waiting for inspiration. Finding a 'mechanical' w