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Waste Reduction Workshop Kit

Drive Down Costs, Improve Performance and Engage Your Teams


Price - $37.00 USD

Improve your lean manufacturing projects with this waste walking kit.
Available for immediate download.

If you are looking for a way to get your staff more involved with the Lean manufacturing projects you have planned for your business then this waste walking reduction workshop kit is ideal. Combining a practical approach with a suite of quick to use templates, the waste reduction workshop is easy to use and available for immediate download.

Are your Lean projects going the way you had hoped?

Waste reduction and engaging your teams is at the heart of the Lean approach to business improvement. This kit is a collection of tools, a presentation, instructions and a workbook that you can download via this site immediately after payment. The kit is based on a successful workshop series delivered by Giles Johnston, the creator of this product, to manufacturing companies of different shapes and sizes.
Giles is a Chartered Engineer who has a background in Production Management. These ideas have been used in factories where Giles has been employed as a Production Manager and with his consulting clients, to improve staff participation with Lean programmes.
One of the hardest challenges with any Lean programme is to get the people who can make a real difference, the operators and staff of the business, engaged with what you are trying to achieve. Waste walking is the core element of this kit and this gentle entry into the Lean method of improving a business is a fabulous way to generate both improvement ideas and get people starting to realise the power they have in their own roles to make the business improve.


What is waste walking?

This kit aims to teach the ideas of Lean to your team before taking them on a waste walk, a walk around your business to identify where there are opportunities to improve.
The presentation that is included in the kit will allow you to educate and discuss the ideas of waste reduction and Lean with your team in preparation for the walk around your business.
You may be thinking that waste walking sounds straightforward and you’d be right.
The value of this kit is the supporting materials to prepare and engage your team prior to the walk itself.

This kit includes:

  • Presentation, including notes and explanations so that you can start using the presentation slides without having to figure out what it all means.
  • Handout, for use by individual participants during the workshop.
  • Worksheets, to complement the waste walking section of the workshop.
  • Improvement Log, to help capture, prioritise and manage the improvements that are generated during the workshop.
  • Instructions, to help you plan and refine the workshop as well as how to use the various elements of the kit.
Many people are put off running their own internal workshops, the intention of this kit is to make it easy to run the workshop yourself and make waste walking part of your regular business improvement toolkit. All of the items listed above are available for immediate download.


Managing the ideas

One of the frustrations that many people have when participating in any form of idea generation / continuous improvement activity is that their ideas disappear once the session has finished. Getting ideas to come forward is hard enough at the outset, but losing momentum is disastrous.

People need to know where their ideas are, and where they fit into the overall scheme of things. Included with the kit is an ‘improvement log’. This is designed to:

  • manage the conversation around the improvement idea,
  • provide clear prioritisation of the idea,
  • embed the PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) approach into your team.

If it is perceived that the ideas put forward are not being worked on in the business then ideas tend to dry up (People think ‘why bother?’) . The improvement log can help to create a sustainable approach to waste reduction.


Continuous Improvement

Many continuous improvement approaches are not continuous in nature; they are stop / start, based on when there is a problem in the business. This kit helps to bridge that gap and provide a tool for your business that can yield ongoing results going forward.
You do need to lead your team and support engagement with the process, but this becomes easy to facilitate when you use the approach in this kit.
You can use the workshop format from this kit to capture other business improvement ideas too. The improvement log will help you to manage all of your improvement ideas without the improvement approach appearing to get clogged or jammed.
The more times you run this workshop inside your business, and especially take people waste walking, the more switched on people will become, enabling them to spot improvement ideas and support the testing and implementation of these ideas themselves.
Whether your continuous improvement approach is established, or yet to start, this waste reduction workshop kit can help you to move your business in the right direction.


Money Back Guarantee

A full money back guarantee is offered should you be unhappy with your purchase during the first 30 days. Just drop us an email and we will gladly refund your money.
So, there really is no risk with choosing to buy our ‘Waste Reduction Workshop Kit’.


Buy and Download Today

Click on the ‘Buy Now’ button below to securely purchase this kit.
Once you have completed your payment via PayPal you will be re-directed to the download page.


P.S. How many improvements do you need to make in your business to recoup this investment?

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